Friday, April 28, 2017 CULTURE

Skip Navigation Links
 
link
 
link
SUPPLEMENT

Visitor Login










Bangla Kheyal enthrals audience

The Holiday Desk
 
A musical evening of ‘Bangla Kheyal,’ compèred by eminent composer and maestro Ustad Azad Rahman, was held under the aegis of the Indira Gandhi Cultural Centre at Bangladesh National Museum in Dhaka on 21 April. The programme included Bangla Dhrupad, Dhamar, Kheyal, Thumri, Tarana and Ghazals. The performing artistes were Dr. Asit Roy, Professor, Department of Music, Rajshahi University, Dr. Podminee Dey Rupali, Chairman, Department of Music, Rajshahi University, Ms. Alif Laila, Assistant Professor, Jatiyo Kobi Kazi Nazrul Islam University, Mymensingh and Mr. Bijon Mistri, Classical Music Teacher, Chayyanaut. 
The programme under the direction of Azad Rahaman began with a chorus song performed by 60 participants from Sangskriti Kendra and other teaching institutions. Four eminent classical vocalists of Bangladesh presented Bangla Drupad, Dhamar, Kheyal, Thumri and Bangla Ghazal. The chorus songs were on Raga Vimpolasree – ‘Gayano Joty Jalao’ Raga ahir vhairab – ‘Ma ma bole dako’, Raga poto deep – ‘Sobar upore manus sotto’. Dr. Asit Roy presented Dhamar; Raag- Emon ‘Apon Ronge Khelbo Holi’, Dhrupod- ‘Guru Bondona Kori Ekagro mone’, ‘Tarana’ Raag –Malkaus.
Alif Laila presented Raga: Bhinnosoroj, Kheyal – ‘Anubohbe Bujechhi Bhalobasa’, Thumri; Raga; Pahari – ‘Sotobar eki Kotha Bolbo’. Bijon Mistri presented Raga; Bilombito –‘Ei Manob Jibon’, Kheyal- ‘Kisher o Lagiya Esechi Bhubone’.
Dr. Padmini Dey Rupali presented two Bangla Ghazals ‘Morte Hobe Eka, Eka bacha Jabena’, ‘Bhalobasa Badhe Basha Ontore.’ Dr. Asit Roy presented a Tarana.
Accompanists were Mr. Alamgir Parvez Sumon, Assistant Professor, Rajshahi University, on Pakhoaj, Iftekhar Alam Dollar on Tabla, Mr. Ratan Chandra Mazumder on harmonium, Mr. Bodruzzaman Tushar on Tanpura and Ms. Kaniz Fatema Jeba on Tanpura.
 
Various adornments of Kheyal
Lighter than dhrupad, kheyal is the second branch of classical music which allows the artiste to freely play with various adornments. It is said that it originated from kawali, a form of devotional song, and modified into kheyal by Hazrat Amir Khasru (1253-1325). 
Khayal was popularised by Niyamat Khan who was also known as Sadarang, and his nephew Firoz Khan also known as Adarang, both musicians in the court of Muhammad Shah Rangile (1719–1748). 
Poet Kazi Nazrul Islam is credited to have composed over three thousand songs many of which are based on Hindustani classical raga. According to renowned musicologists the poet created 17 new raga, namely Arun Bhairab, Arunranjani, Sandhya Malati, Shiva Saraswati, Udasi Bhairab, Devayani, Asha Bhairabi, Shivani Bhairabi, Rudra Bhairab, Bonokuntala, Benuka, Minakshi, Yogini, Shankari, Nirjhorini, Dolonchampa and Roopamonjori. He adapted a wide range of North Indian musical styles such as dhrupad, khayal or kheyal, tappa, thumri and so on.
In Bangladesh Ustad Gul Mohammad Khan (1876-1979) was a singer of dhrupad and kheyal. Ustad Mohammad Hossain Khasru (1903-1959), founder principal of the Bulbul Lalitakala Academy or Bulbul Academy for Fine Arts (BAFA), was a consummate classical musician. He was a distinguished singer of kheyal and thumri.
A former Director General of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy for two terms, Principal of Government Music College, Mr. Rahman is one of the pioneers of Bengali Kheyal and has written lyrics for many raagas. He produced the first Bangla Kheyal LP in the 1980s and has also composed and sung Bangla Qawwalis. He gave tune to the patriotic song of Bangladesh “Jonmo Amar Dhonno Holo Maago” sung by Feroza Begum and later by Sabina Yasmin. He also played Hindustani ragas on the piano and released them as an LP. Azad Rahman is the founder chairman of Sangskriti Kendra which has organized several international music festivals since 1990.

Comment

The Holiday Desk
 
A musical evening of ‘Bangla Kheyal,’ compèred by eminent composer and maestro Ustad Azad Rahman, was held under the aegis of the Indira Gandhi Cultural Centre at Bangladesh National Museum in Dhaka on 21 April. The programme included Bangla Dhrupad, Dhamar, Kheyal, Thumri, Tarana and Ghazals. The performing artistes were Dr. Asit Roy, Professor, Department of Music, Rajshahi University, Dr. Podminee Dey Rupali, Chairman, Department of Music, Rajshahi University, Ms. Alif Laila, Assistant Professor, Jatiyo Kobi Kazi Nazrul Islam University, Mymensingh and Mr. Bijon Mistri, Classical Music Teacher, Chayyanaut. 
The programme under the direction of Azad Rahaman began with a chorus song performed by 60 participants from Sangskriti Kendra and other teaching institutions. Four eminent classical vocalists of Bangladesh presented Bangla Drupad, Dhamar, Kheyal, Thumri and Bangla Ghazal. The chorus songs were on Raga Vimpolasree – ‘Gayano Joty Jalao’ Raga ahir vhairab – ‘Ma ma bole dako’, Raga poto deep – ‘Sobar upore manus sotto’. Dr. Asit Roy presented Dhamar; Raag- Emon ‘Apon Ronge Khelbo Holi’, Dhrupod- ‘Guru Bondona Kori Ekagro mone’, ‘Tarana’ Raag –Malkaus.
Alif Laila presented Raga: Bhinnosoroj, Kheyal – ‘Anubohbe Bujechhi Bhalobasa’, Thumri; Raga; Pahari – ‘Sotobar eki Kotha Bolbo’. Bijon Mistri presented Raga; Bilombito –‘Ei Manob Jibon’, Kheyal- ‘Kisher o Lagiya Esechi Bhubone’.
Dr. Padmini Dey Rupali presented two Bangla Ghazals ‘Morte Hobe Eka, Eka bacha Jabena’, ‘Bhalobasa Badhe Basha Ontore.’ Dr. Asit Roy presented a Tarana.
Accompanists were Mr. Alamgir Parvez Sumon, Assistant Professor, Rajshahi University, on Pakhoaj, Iftekhar Alam Dollar on Tabla, Mr. Ratan Chandra Mazumder on harmonium, Mr. Bodruzzaman Tushar on Tanpura and Ms. Kaniz Fatema Jeba on Tanpura.
 
Various adornments of Kheyal
Lighter than dhrupad, kheyal is the second branch of classical music which allows the artiste to freely play with various adornments. It is said that it originated from kawali, a form of devotional song, and modified into kheyal by Hazrat Amir Khasru (1253-1325). 
Khayal was popularised by Niyamat Khan who was also known as Sadarang, and his nephew Firoz Khan also known as Adarang, both musicians in the court of Muhammad Shah Rangile (1719–1748). 
Poet Kazi Nazrul Islam is credited to have composed over three thousand songs many of which are based on Hindustani classical raga. According to renowned musicologists the poet created 17 new raga, namely Arun Bhairab, Arunranjani, Sandhya Malati, Shiva Saraswati, Udasi Bhairab, Devayani, Asha Bhairabi, Shivani Bhairabi, Rudra Bhairab, Bonokuntala, Benuka, Minakshi, Yogini, Shankari, Nirjhorini, Dolonchampa and Roopamonjori. He adapted a wide range of North Indian musical styles such as dhrupad, khayal or kheyal, tappa, thumri and so on.
In Bangladesh Ustad Gul Mohammad Khan (1876-1979) was a singer of dhrupad and kheyal. Ustad Mohammad Hossain Khasru (1903-1959), founder principal of the Bulbul Lalitakala Academy or Bulbul Academy for Fine Arts (BAFA), was a consummate classical musician. He was a distinguished singer of kheyal and thumri.
A former Director General of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy for two terms, Principal of Government Music College, Mr. Rahman is one of the pioneers of Bengali Kheyal and has written lyrics for many raagas. He produced the first Bangla Kheyal LP in the 1980s and has also composed and sung Bangla Qawwalis. He gave tune to the patriotic song of Bangladesh “Jonmo Amar Dhonno Holo Maago” sung by Feroza Begum and later by Sabina Yasmin. He also played Hindustani ragas on the piano and released them as an LP. Azad Rahman is the founder chairman of Sangskriti Kendra which has organized several international music festivals since 1990.

Login to post comments


(0)



REVIVAL AFTER RANA PLAZA TRAGEDY
Photo show glorifies apparel workers’ efforts
Cultural Correspondent
 
A visitor looks at displayed paintings at Bengal Art Lounge.
A photography exhibition glorifying efforts of apparel workers’ for reviving the apparel industry following the Rana Plaza tragedy is underway at Bengal Art Lounge in Gulshan-1.
The displayed photographs show apparel workers busy at work. The workers in the pictures do not forget to smile and continues to work as they take country’s apparel industry forward.
The photographs have been taken by internationally acclaimed National Geographic photographer Alison Wright, who visited Bangladesh after Rana Plaza disaster to document the apparel industry of the country.
The multi-billion dollar local apparel industry suffered a blow and its global image was tarnished after 2013 Rana Plaza disaster, which claimed lives of 1,129 garment workers - who used to work at different garment factories inside the building.
Bangladeshi is well known for producing garments for international brands. The exhibition depicts the quality of locally manufactured garments by displaying sewing machines and clothes made by local workers for international brands.
A number of factories provide apparel workers with facilities like health insurance and medical checkup on regular basis.
A displayed text in the exhibition tells the story of a garment worker named Moina who works at a denim factory. She feels secured as she has been provided with a health insurance policy for garment workers.
‘The purpose of the exhibition is to tell the world about the good things going on in the apparel industry of Bangladesh,’ Rashid Tawhid, coordinator of the exhibition, told New Age.
People from all walks of life including garment workers, owners and others are thronging the exhibition daily.
‘The exhibition is very informative as it shows what is really happening in the apparel sector and how the industry is making a comeback,’ said Nurul Hossain, a private service holder.
SNV, a Netherland-based development organisation, has organised the exhibition titled ‘Threads of Change: Celebrating the Lives of Garment Workers’ on the occasion of World Fashion Revolution Week 2017, which is an worldwide movement to ensure safe apparel industry and also marks 4th anniversary of Rana Plaza disaster.
The exhibition, which began on Monday, will remain open for all from 3pm to 8pm till April 30.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent
 
A visitor looks at displayed paintings at Bengal Art Lounge.
A photography exhibition glorifying efforts of apparel workers’ for reviving the apparel industry following the Rana Plaza tragedy is underway at Bengal Art Lounge in Gulshan-1.
The displayed photographs show apparel workers busy at work. The workers in the pictures do not forget to smile and continues to work as they take country’s apparel industry forward.
The photographs have been taken by internationally acclaimed National Geographic photographer Alison Wright, who visited Bangladesh after Rana Plaza disaster to document the apparel industry of the country.
The multi-billion dollar local apparel industry suffered a blow and its global image was tarnished after 2013 Rana Plaza disaster, which claimed lives of 1,129 garment workers - who used to work at different garment factories inside the building.
Bangladeshi is well known for producing garments for international brands. The exhibition depicts the quality of locally manufactured garments by displaying sewing machines and clothes made by local workers for international brands.
A number of factories provide apparel workers with facilities like health insurance and medical checkup on regular basis.
A displayed text in the exhibition tells the story of a garment worker named Moina who works at a denim factory. She feels secured as she has been provided with a health insurance policy for garment workers.
‘The purpose of the exhibition is to tell the world about the good things going on in the apparel industry of Bangladesh,’ Rashid Tawhid, coordinator of the exhibition, told New Age.
People from all walks of life including garment workers, owners and others are thronging the exhibition daily.
‘The exhibition is very informative as it shows what is really happening in the apparel sector and how the industry is making a comeback,’ said Nurul Hossain, a private service holder.
SNV, a Netherland-based development organisation, has organised the exhibition titled ‘Threads of Change: Celebrating the Lives of Garment Workers’ on the occasion of World Fashion Revolution Week 2017, which is an worldwide movement to ensure safe apparel industry and also marks 4th anniversary of Rana Plaza disaster.
The exhibition, which began on Monday, will remain open for all from 3pm to 8pm till April 30.

Login to post comments


(0)



National Museum goes virtual

Cultural Correspondent
 
A screen grab shows virtual display of exhibits at a gallery in Bangladesh National Museum.
Bangladesh National Museum has launched a 360 degree virtual gallery through which anyone will be able to enjoy a virtual tour of the museum and watch displayed exhibits online.
Interested individuals would be able to enjoy the virtual tour by visiting www.bangladeshmuseum.gov.bd/vt/. As part of the tour an audience would be able to visit any gallery in the museum and see displays. Images of exhibits can be enlarged for better views.
The virtual gallery has been created as part of a project titled ‘Access 2 Information’ of the prime minister’s office.
Tawfiq-e-Elahi Chowdhury, energy adviser to the prime minister, launched the virtual gallery at Sufia Kamal auditorium of the museum on Tuesday.
Cultural affairs minister Asaduzzaman Noor, curator of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Memorial Museum Mohammad Nazrul Islam and director of A2I Kabir Bin Anwar were present on the occasion. The inaugural programme included a discussion chaired by Hashem Khan, noted artist and also president of the board of Trustees of the museum.
Director general of the museum Faizul Latif Chowdhury delivered the welcome speech at the session. In his speech, Faizul Latif Chowdhury said that the museum authority is constantly trying to make the museum more tech-friendly.
‘The museum launched e-ticketing system this January and the process of introducing online ticket booking is currently in process,’ said Faizul Latif, adding that the average number of daily visitors has increased greatly in the recent years. Tawfiq-e-Elahi Chowdhury said that the online virtual gallery will play a crucial role in making people aware about the country’s heritage and culture.
Asaduzzaman Noor said that the museum through the virtual gallery will promote Bangladesh’s culture and heritage across the world.

 

Comment

Cultural Correspondent
 
A screen grab shows virtual display of exhibits at a gallery in Bangladesh National Museum.
Bangladesh National Museum has launched a 360 degree virtual gallery through which anyone will be able to enjoy a virtual tour of the museum and watch displayed exhibits online.
Interested individuals would be able to enjoy the virtual tour by visiting www.bangladeshmuseum.gov.bd/vt/. As part of the tour an audience would be able to visit any gallery in the museum and see displays. Images of exhibits can be enlarged for better views.
The virtual gallery has been created as part of a project titled ‘Access 2 Information’ of the prime minister’s office.
Tawfiq-e-Elahi Chowdhury, energy adviser to the prime minister, launched the virtual gallery at Sufia Kamal auditorium of the museum on Tuesday.
Cultural affairs minister Asaduzzaman Noor, curator of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Memorial Museum Mohammad Nazrul Islam and director of A2I Kabir Bin Anwar were present on the occasion. The inaugural programme included a discussion chaired by Hashem Khan, noted artist and also president of the board of Trustees of the museum.
Director general of the museum Faizul Latif Chowdhury delivered the welcome speech at the session. In his speech, Faizul Latif Chowdhury said that the museum authority is constantly trying to make the museum more tech-friendly.
‘The museum launched e-ticketing system this January and the process of introducing online ticket booking is currently in process,’ said Faizul Latif, adding that the average number of daily visitors has increased greatly in the recent years. Tawfiq-e-Elahi Chowdhury said that the online virtual gallery will play a crucial role in making people aware about the country’s heritage and culture.
Asaduzzaman Noor said that the museum through the virtual gallery will promote Bangladesh’s culture and heritage across the world.

 


Login to post comments


(0)



Weeklong dance fest underway at Shilpakala Academy

Cultural Correspondent
 
A troupe presents dance at National Art Plaza of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy on Sunday. — Snigdha Zaman
A weeklong dance festival and fair organised by Bangladesh Nritya Shilpy Sangstha marking the upcoming International Dance Day is underway at the National Art Plaza of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.
The event features dance recitals by troupes and solo artistes from across the county and display of different attires, jewellery and other items related to dance.
Seasoned dancer Rahiza Khanom Jhunu inaugurated the event on Sunday afternoon.
An open stage has been set up on the fair premises which will feature dance performances every evening till April 29 when the World Dance Day will be celebrated.
A colouful dance show and a discussion was held at the the National Theatre hall of BSA.
Different dance organisations including Pallavi, Nataraj, Bangladesh academy of Fine Arts, Spandan and others performed at the programme.
The dance show commenced with a dance performance by artistes of Pallavi synchronised with the song Banglar Mati Banglar Jal.
Dancers from Bangladesh Academy of Fine Arts danced with the patriotic song Eki Apurup Rupey Ma Tomar at the show.
A highlight of the event was a dance production by Nrityajon which featured patriotic songs and poems like Muktir o Mondire, Banglar Mati Bangla Jal and Shamsur Rahman’s poem Swadhinata Tumi.
Spandan dancers staged a dance recital syncronised with the Tagore song Alo Amar Alo Go at the show.
Earlier a discussion was held on the occasion. Among others, President of BNSS Minu Haque, president of Sammilito Sangskritik Jote Golam Kuddus and noted dancers Laila Hasan and Amanul Haque were present at the discussion session.
Speaking about the dance festival Minu Haque said the event will provide the dancers of the country with a common platform. ‘During the week-long event dancers from different districts will come to Dhaka and present dance,’ Minu Haque told New Age.
BNSS has been organising the festival since 2002. This year the organisation will honour seasoned dancer Ilias Haider with life time achievement award.

Comment

Cultural Correspondent
 
A troupe presents dance at National Art Plaza of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy on Sunday. — Snigdha Zaman
A weeklong dance festival and fair organised by Bangladesh Nritya Shilpy Sangstha marking the upcoming International Dance Day is underway at the National Art Plaza of Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.
The event features dance recitals by troupes and solo artistes from across the county and display of different attires, jewellery and other items related to dance.
Seasoned dancer Rahiza Khanom Jhunu inaugurated the event on Sunday afternoon.
An open stage has been set up on the fair premises which will feature dance performances every evening till April 29 when the World Dance Day will be celebrated.
A colouful dance show and a discussion was held at the the National Theatre hall of BSA.
Different dance organisations including Pallavi, Nataraj, Bangladesh academy of Fine Arts, Spandan and others performed at the programme.
The dance show commenced with a dance performance by artistes of Pallavi synchronised with the song Banglar Mati Banglar Jal.
Dancers from Bangladesh Academy of Fine Arts danced with the patriotic song Eki Apurup Rupey Ma Tomar at the show.
A highlight of the event was a dance production by Nrityajon which featured patriotic songs and poems like Muktir o Mondire, Banglar Mati Bangla Jal and Shamsur Rahman’s poem Swadhinata Tumi.
Spandan dancers staged a dance recital syncronised with the Tagore song Alo Amar Alo Go at the show.
Earlier a discussion was held on the occasion. Among others, President of BNSS Minu Haque, president of Sammilito Sangskritik Jote Golam Kuddus and noted dancers Laila Hasan and Amanul Haque were present at the discussion session.
Speaking about the dance festival Minu Haque said the event will provide the dancers of the country with a common platform. ‘During the week-long event dancers from different districts will come to Dhaka and present dance,’ Minu Haque told New Age.
BNSS has been organising the festival since 2002. This year the organisation will honour seasoned dancer Ilias Haider with life time achievement award.

Login to post comments


(0)



‘Lipstick Under My Burkha’ film cleared for release

Cultural Reporter
 
An award-winning Hindi film exploring women’s sexuality that was blocked by India’s censorship board for being “lady-oriented” has been cleared for release by an appeals tribunal, officials said.
India’s Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) sparked uproar in February when it refused to certify “Lipstick Under My Burkha”, in a case that again raised fears over creative freedom in the country.
Director Alankrita Shrivastava appealed the decision and in a statement published late Tuesday the Film Certification Appellate Tribunal (FCAT) ordered the CBFC to release the movie, albeit with a few cuts.
“There cannot be any embargo on a women-oriented film or one containing sexual fantasies and expression of the inner desires of women,” the FCAT said, according to the Press Trust of India news agency.
It ruled that “Lipstick Under My Burkha” was suitable for anyone aged 18 or over and should be given an adult certificate.
It accepted several cuts offered by the filmmakers and ordered a reference to “prostitutes” to be removed, as well as ruling that the length of some sex scenes should be reduced.
“Of course I would have loved no cuts, but the FCAT has been very fair and clear. I feel that we will be able to release the film without hampering the narrative or diluting its essence,” Shrivastava told AFP.
The movie tells the secret lives of four women — including a college student who wears a burkha, and a 55-year-old who rediscovers a sex life after the death of her husband.
It won an award at the Tokyo International Film Festival last year and aired at the MAMI Mumbai Film Festival in October. It also appeared at a film festival in Los Angeles earlier this month.
The CBFC had ruled that the movie was “lady oriented, their fantasy above (sic) life”.
It complained of “sexual scenes, abusive words, audio pornography (phone sex) and a bit sensitive touch about one particular section of society”, implying that it might offend Muslims.
The ruling was widely mocked on social media while Shrivastava described it as an “assault on women’s rights”.
India’s censors have a long history of barring movies and cutting scenes, especially those deemed too racy or at risk of causing religious offence.
In 2015 the CBFC blocked the release of a toned-down version of “Fifty Shades of Grey” and deemed two James Bond kissing scenes unsuitable for an Indian audience.

Comment

Cultural Reporter
 
An award-winning Hindi film exploring women’s sexuality that was blocked by India’s censorship board for being “lady-oriented” has been cleared for release by an appeals tribunal, officials said.
India’s Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) sparked uproar in February when it refused to certify “Lipstick Under My Burkha”, in a case that again raised fears over creative freedom in the country.
Director Alankrita Shrivastava appealed the decision and in a statement published late Tuesday the Film Certification Appellate Tribunal (FCAT) ordered the CBFC to release the movie, albeit with a few cuts.
“There cannot be any embargo on a women-oriented film or one containing sexual fantasies and expression of the inner desires of women,” the FCAT said, according to the Press Trust of India news agency.
It ruled that “Lipstick Under My Burkha” was suitable for anyone aged 18 or over and should be given an adult certificate.
It accepted several cuts offered by the filmmakers and ordered a reference to “prostitutes” to be removed, as well as ruling that the length of some sex scenes should be reduced.
“Of course I would have loved no cuts, but the FCAT has been very fair and clear. I feel that we will be able to release the film without hampering the narrative or diluting its essence,” Shrivastava told AFP.
The movie tells the secret lives of four women — including a college student who wears a burkha, and a 55-year-old who rediscovers a sex life after the death of her husband.
It won an award at the Tokyo International Film Festival last year and aired at the MAMI Mumbai Film Festival in October. It also appeared at a film festival in Los Angeles earlier this month.
The CBFC had ruled that the movie was “lady oriented, their fantasy above (sic) life”.
It complained of “sexual scenes, abusive words, audio pornography (phone sex) and a bit sensitive touch about one particular section of society”, implying that it might offend Muslims.
The ruling was widely mocked on social media while Shrivastava described it as an “assault on women’s rights”.
India’s censors have a long history of barring movies and cutting scenes, especially those deemed too racy or at risk of causing religious offence.
In 2015 the CBFC blocked the release of a toned-down version of “Fifty Shades of Grey” and deemed two James Bond kissing scenes unsuitable for an Indian audience.

Login to post comments


(0)



METROPOLITAN
EDITORIAL
COMMENTS
INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS
INFOTECH
CULTURE
MISCELLANY
AVIATOUR
LETTERS
LAST WORD
FOUNDING EDITOR: ENAYETULLAH KHAN; EDITOR: SAYED KAMALUDDIN
Contents Copyrighted © by Holiday Publication Limited
Mailing address 30, Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.
Phone 880-2-8170462, 8170463, 8170464 Fax 880-2-9127927 Email holiday@bangla.net
Site Managed By: Southtech Limited
Southtech Limited does not take any responsibility for any news content of this site