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Rohingya Muslims repatriation: Myanmar doesn’t want to solve the crisis

Dear Editor:
It is a fact that the plight of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims is said to be the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis. Risking death by sea or on foot, more than half a million have fled the destruction of their homes and persecution in the northern Rakhine province of Myanmar (Burma) for neighbouring Bangladesh since August 2017.
The United Nations described the military offensive in Rakhine, which provoked the exodus, as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing”.
Myanmar’s military says it is fighting Rohingya militants and denies targeting civilians.
The website of the United News of Bngladesh published on 08 October, 2017 a heartbreaking news story by Nahar Khan who watched at Shah Porir Dwip mostly women and children, struggling to carry very little of their lives that they had brought along—-mothers clenching the tiny hands of their children, elderly struggling not to slip through the muddy terrains, men hauling the remains of their household belongings, and children carrying screaming babies. She met Khadiza Begum, seven months pregnant and a mother of two, who was waiting to reach the camps with her mother. Her husband was still stranded in Myanmar, waiting to reunite with her. She could not help but remain optimistic when asked when she could see him again.
Khadiza along with others were all headed to various camps that have sprung up over the past several weeks – Kutupalong, Palongkhali, Thengkhali to name a few. It is obvious that the camps have reached its full capacity and was on overdrive, with more incoming Rohingya increasing by the day. The distress of displacement is something which we cannot imagine, even if we stepped into their shoes for a day. The mass exodus is of grave concern, as the Rohingya, upon being asked whether they would return back to Myanmar if given the chance, remain conflicted with their answer. As the debate on whether Bangladesh should make space for the Rohingya rages on, it is clear that we are their only hope in terms of providing shelter.
Myanmar’s de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi pulled out of a public speech and question-and-answer session in Sydney because she was “not feeling well”, the event’s organisers said. Suu Kyi has been under fire internationally for her public silence about a military crackdown in Myanmar’s Rakhine state that has seen nearly 7,00,000 of the Muslim Rohingya minority flee to Bangladesh.
Myanmar has no real intention to solve the crisis.
Shafiq Adnan Nabil
Neelkhet, Dhaka

Comment

Dear Editor:
It is a fact that the plight of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims is said to be the world’s fastest growing refugee crisis. Risking death by sea or on foot, more than half a million have fled the destruction of their homes and persecution in the northern Rakhine province of Myanmar (Burma) for neighbouring Bangladesh since August 2017.
The United Nations described the military offensive in Rakhine, which provoked the exodus, as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing”.
Myanmar’s military says it is fighting Rohingya militants and denies targeting civilians.
The website of the United News of Bngladesh published on 08 October, 2017 a heartbreaking news story by Nahar Khan who watched at Shah Porir Dwip mostly women and children, struggling to carry very little of their lives that they had brought along—-mothers clenching the tiny hands of their children, elderly struggling not to slip through the muddy terrains, men hauling the remains of their household belongings, and children carrying screaming babies. She met Khadiza Begum, seven months pregnant and a mother of two, who was waiting to reach the camps with her mother. Her husband was still stranded in Myanmar, waiting to reunite with her. She could not help but remain optimistic when asked when she could see him again.
Khadiza along with others were all headed to various camps that have sprung up over the past several weeks – Kutupalong, Palongkhali, Thengkhali to name a few. It is obvious that the camps have reached its full capacity and was on overdrive, with more incoming Rohingya increasing by the day. The distress of displacement is something which we cannot imagine, even if we stepped into their shoes for a day. The mass exodus is of grave concern, as the Rohingya, upon being asked whether they would return back to Myanmar if given the chance, remain conflicted with their answer. As the debate on whether Bangladesh should make space for the Rohingya rages on, it is clear that we are their only hope in terms of providing shelter.
Myanmar’s de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi pulled out of a public speech and question-and-answer session in Sydney because she was “not feeling well”, the event’s organisers said. Suu Kyi has been under fire internationally for her public silence about a military crackdown in Myanmar’s Rakhine state that has seen nearly 7,00,000 of the Muslim Rohingya minority flee to Bangladesh.
Myanmar has no real intention to solve the crisis.
Shafiq Adnan Nabil
Neelkhet, Dhaka


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