Friday, January 19, 2018 LETTERS

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Corporal punishment has to be banned

Dear Editor:
It is highly admirable that Sir Frank Peters—-a former newspaper and magazine publisher and editor, a humanitarian, a royal Goodwill Ambassador and a foreign friend of Bangladesh—-has been tirelessly motivating the people of Bangladesh to bring to an end the scourge og corporal punishment in schools.
January 13th marked the seventh anniversary of the banning of corporal punishment in all Bangladeshi schools. Sir Frank has very correctly written in the Holiday on January 12, 2018 that “it doesn’t matter from which angle you look; corporal punishment isn’t pretty. It serves no useful purpose whatsoever, but causes untold damage by creating damaged children, broken adults and fashions an appalling society that everybody loathes.”
Let’s be bold, courageous, call a spade a spade, jump-in at the deep end, and make it categorically clear there is nothing that justifies corporal punishment in the eyes of God or man...NOTHING!
Sir Frank wrote, “Poor parenting and poor teaching skills do not justify corporal punishment and those who dish it out are not only lawbreakers, but working against the wishes of the Creator. Moulana Muhammad Khan Sherani, Chairman of the Council of Islamic Ideology, told the world media last year that Islam STRICTLY prohibits physical punishment of both males and females.
“Those of Christian belief can seek references in the Bible where it says Mary and Joseph beat Jesus or that Jesus beat the children he taught, but they won’t be able to find any.
“But, it advises in the Good Book that if you spare the ‘rod’ you spoil the child,” I hear you scream. That priceless advice is there, but the problem is in the misinterpretation of the word ‘rod’. In Hebrew the word ‘rod’ is the same word used in Psalms 23:4, ‘thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me.’ The shepherd’s rod/staff was/is used to ENCOURAGE, GUIDE, and DISCIPLINE the sheep towards taking a desired direction, NOT to beat, hurt or damage them.
K M Abul Hasnat
Sadarghat, Chittagong

Comment

Dear Editor:
It is highly admirable that Sir Frank Peters—-a former newspaper and magazine publisher and editor, a humanitarian, a royal Goodwill Ambassador and a foreign friend of Bangladesh—-has been tirelessly motivating the people of Bangladesh to bring to an end the scourge og corporal punishment in schools.
January 13th marked the seventh anniversary of the banning of corporal punishment in all Bangladeshi schools. Sir Frank has very correctly written in the Holiday on January 12, 2018 that “it doesn’t matter from which angle you look; corporal punishment isn’t pretty. It serves no useful purpose whatsoever, but causes untold damage by creating damaged children, broken adults and fashions an appalling society that everybody loathes.”
Let’s be bold, courageous, call a spade a spade, jump-in at the deep end, and make it categorically clear there is nothing that justifies corporal punishment in the eyes of God or man...NOTHING!
Sir Frank wrote, “Poor parenting and poor teaching skills do not justify corporal punishment and those who dish it out are not only lawbreakers, but working against the wishes of the Creator. Moulana Muhammad Khan Sherani, Chairman of the Council of Islamic Ideology, told the world media last year that Islam STRICTLY prohibits physical punishment of both males and females.
“Those of Christian belief can seek references in the Bible where it says Mary and Joseph beat Jesus or that Jesus beat the children he taught, but they won’t be able to find any.
“But, it advises in the Good Book that if you spare the ‘rod’ you spoil the child,” I hear you scream. That priceless advice is there, but the problem is in the misinterpretation of the word ‘rod’. In Hebrew the word ‘rod’ is the same word used in Psalms 23:4, ‘thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me.’ The shepherd’s rod/staff was/is used to ENCOURAGE, GUIDE, and DISCIPLINE the sheep towards taking a desired direction, NOT to beat, hurt or damage them.
K M Abul Hasnat
Sadarghat, Chittagong


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Polluted Dhaka city: Whither our civic sense?

Dear Editor:
Contaminated air, stale smell, and a invasive lack of cleanliness dishearten one to walk on city streets. We do not have the required number of roads and footpaths in the capital city, unfortunately. Walkable places don’t rely on footpaths alone. Walking becomes an attractive metropolitan experience when footpaths offer views of monuments, historic buildings, shopping malls, greenery and water and public places.
Peoples in all cities of the world can walk but in Dhaka the city dwellers cannot walk. It is a fact that traffic speed in Dhaka swings between 5 to 6 kph, and the number of roads here is too small. This problem was pointed out on January 13, 2018 by Adnan Morshed in a premier daily of the country. The overcrowded footpaths make it virtually impossible to walk without bumping into a fellow pedestrian.
“Studies show that if you walk as part of your daily travel need, you are very likely to develop empathy for your city which may then inspire you to keep your neighbourhood clean or protest when a historic building faces the prospect of demolition due to profit-motivated real estate development. Walking is one of the most effective ways of knowing a city and its communities from an intimate distance. Walkability is a good measure of a city’s liveability”, he said.
Whither our civic sense?
S. Noorus Salam
Azampur, Uttara

Comment

Dear Editor:
Contaminated air, stale smell, and a invasive lack of cleanliness dishearten one to walk on city streets. We do not have the required number of roads and footpaths in the capital city, unfortunately. Walkable places don’t rely on footpaths alone. Walking becomes an attractive metropolitan experience when footpaths offer views of monuments, historic buildings, shopping malls, greenery and water and public places.
Peoples in all cities of the world can walk but in Dhaka the city dwellers cannot walk. It is a fact that traffic speed in Dhaka swings between 5 to 6 kph, and the number of roads here is too small. This problem was pointed out on January 13, 2018 by Adnan Morshed in a premier daily of the country. The overcrowded footpaths make it virtually impossible to walk without bumping into a fellow pedestrian.
“Studies show that if you walk as part of your daily travel need, you are very likely to develop empathy for your city which may then inspire you to keep your neighbourhood clean or protest when a historic building faces the prospect of demolition due to profit-motivated real estate development. Walking is one of the most effective ways of knowing a city and its communities from an intimate distance. Walkability is a good measure of a city’s liveability”, he said.
Whither our civic sense?
S. Noorus Salam
Azampur, Uttara


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