Friday, December 07, 2018 MISCELLANY

Skip Navigation Links
 
link
 
link
SUPPLEMENT

Visitor Login










Human rights law group calls for tribunal on crimes against Rohingya

Online Agencies

A human rights law group contracted by the US State Department to investigate atrocities against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar called on Monday for the urgent establishment of a criminal tribunal to bring those responsible to justice.
There were reasonable grounds to believe the Myanmar military committed crimes against humanity, genocide and war crimes against the minority group, the Public International Law and Policy Group (PILPG) said in a report. The report was based on more than 1,000 interviews with Rohingya refugees who fled to Bangladesh.

The Washington-based group’s use of the term genocide adds pressure on US President Donald Trump’s administration to harden its own characterization of the treatment of the Rohingya, something that could oblige the US government to take stronger punitive measures against Myanmar.
“The international community is obliged to protect populations subjected to atrocity crimes by their own governments and ensure justice and accountability for such crimes,” the report said.
It called for the urgent establishment of an “accountability mechanism,” or referral to the International Criminal Court. It noted that in similar circumstances in the past, different mechanisms had been used, including the ICC, ad hoc tribunals established by the United Nations, and hybrid or domestic tribunals established with the support of intergovernmental organizations.
The military in Myanmar, where Buddhism is the main religion, has denied past accusations that it had committed genocide against the Rohingya and says its actions were part of a fight against terrorism.
Myanmar’s Embassy in Washington did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the report.
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington also issued a statement on Monday saying there was compelling evidence that the Myanmar military committed ethnic cleansing, crimes against humanity and genocide against the Rohingya.
A report by UN investigators in August found that Myanmar’s military carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Rohingyas with “genocidal intent,” and said the commander-in-chief and five generals should be prosecuted under international law.
That report called for the UN Security Council to impose an arms embargo and targeted sanctions as well as for the suspects to be tried by an ad hoc tribunal or referred to the ICC. However, diplomats say veto-wielding powers China and Russia are likely to protect Myanmar, previously known as Burma, from UN action.
The PILPG’s refugee interviews formed the basis of a US State Department report released in September, but Washington stopped short of using the terms crimes against humanity, genocide or war crimes. Monday’s report from PILPG added the group’s legal analysis to its findings on the atrocities.
The State Department report, the subject of an internal debate that delayed its rollout for nearly a month, referred to a “well-planned and coordinated” campaign of mass killings, gang rapes and other atrocities.
A declaration of genocide by the US government, which has only gone as far as labeling the crackdown “ethnic cleansing,” could require Washington to impose stronger sanctions on Myanmar, a country with which it has competed for influence with regional rival China.
Asked about the PILPG report, a State Department spokesperson noted the ethnic cleansing designation Washington has used so far, and said it “continues to review and analyze new evidence and information as it comes to light.”
More than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fled a sweeping army crackdown in Rakhine State last year, according to UN agencies. Human rights groups and Rohingya activists have put the death toll from the crackdown in the thousands.

SENATORS CRITICIZE US STANCE
US senators from both sides of the aisle have criticized Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for not going further in his condemnation.
A congressional aide said the House could vote as soon as next week on a resolution stating that the Rohingya were victims of genocide and crimes against humanity.
The resolution also calls for the release of two Reuters reporters, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, who reported on the killing of 10 Rohingya men in Rakhine State in the west of the country, implicating Myanmar’s security forces.
A Myanmar judge found the two reporters guilty of breaching a law on state secrets and jailed them for seven years in September.
“The State Department had access to the exact same data when developing its report, yet we don’t have any policy announcement from Secretary Pompeo on a genocide determination, nor any other public statement on how the administration views the brutality. What is the reason for this silence?” Democratic Senator Ed Markey said in a statement to Reuters.
Republican Senator Marco Rubio last week called for an immediate determination of genocide.
The lawyers’ report, based on the work of 18 investigators from 11 countries, found that Rohingya men, women, and children were the victims of “mass shootings and aerial bombardments, gang rapes and severe beatings, torture and burning, and attacks from flamethrowers and grenade launchers.”
It focused on the build-up to and conduct of “major systematic attacks” in Myanmar’s Rakhine state between Aug. 25 and Sept. 4 of 2017.
Even as the Rohingya fled for Bangladesh they were fired on by military helicopters while the Myanmar Navy sought to sink overcrowded ferries, the report said, adding this showed the campaign went beyond the aim of merely driving the people out.
“The scale and severity of the attacks and abuses … suggest that, in the minds of the perpetrators, the goal was not just to expel, but also to exterminate the Rohingya,” the report said.

Comment

Online Agencies

A human rights law group contracted by the US State Department to investigate atrocities against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar called on Monday for the urgent establishment of a criminal tribunal to bring those responsible to justice.
There were reasonable grounds to believe the Myanmar military committed crimes against humanity, genocide and war crimes against the minority group, the Public International Law and Policy Group (PILPG) said in a report. The report was based on more than 1,000 interviews with Rohingya refugees who fled to Bangladesh.

The Washington-based group’s use of the term genocide adds pressure on US President Donald Trump’s administration to harden its own characterization of the treatment of the Rohingya, something that could oblige the US government to take stronger punitive measures against Myanmar.
“The international community is obliged to protect populations subjected to atrocity crimes by their own governments and ensure justice and accountability for such crimes,” the report said.
It called for the urgent establishment of an “accountability mechanism,” or referral to the International Criminal Court. It noted that in similar circumstances in the past, different mechanisms had been used, including the ICC, ad hoc tribunals established by the United Nations, and hybrid or domestic tribunals established with the support of intergovernmental organizations.
The military in Myanmar, where Buddhism is the main religion, has denied past accusations that it had committed genocide against the Rohingya and says its actions were part of a fight against terrorism.
Myanmar’s Embassy in Washington did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the report.
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington also issued a statement on Monday saying there was compelling evidence that the Myanmar military committed ethnic cleansing, crimes against humanity and genocide against the Rohingya.
A report by UN investigators in August found that Myanmar’s military carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Rohingyas with “genocidal intent,” and said the commander-in-chief and five generals should be prosecuted under international law.
That report called for the UN Security Council to impose an arms embargo and targeted sanctions as well as for the suspects to be tried by an ad hoc tribunal or referred to the ICC. However, diplomats say veto-wielding powers China and Russia are likely to protect Myanmar, previously known as Burma, from UN action.
The PILPG’s refugee interviews formed the basis of a US State Department report released in September, but Washington stopped short of using the terms crimes against humanity, genocide or war crimes. Monday’s report from PILPG added the group’s legal analysis to its findings on the atrocities.
The State Department report, the subject of an internal debate that delayed its rollout for nearly a month, referred to a “well-planned and coordinated” campaign of mass killings, gang rapes and other atrocities.
A declaration of genocide by the US government, which has only gone as far as labeling the crackdown “ethnic cleansing,” could require Washington to impose stronger sanctions on Myanmar, a country with which it has competed for influence with regional rival China.
Asked about the PILPG report, a State Department spokesperson noted the ethnic cleansing designation Washington has used so far, and said it “continues to review and analyze new evidence and information as it comes to light.”
More than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fled a sweeping army crackdown in Rakhine State last year, according to UN agencies. Human rights groups and Rohingya activists have put the death toll from the crackdown in the thousands.

SENATORS CRITICIZE US STANCE
US senators from both sides of the aisle have criticized Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for not going further in his condemnation.
A congressional aide said the House could vote as soon as next week on a resolution stating that the Rohingya were victims of genocide and crimes against humanity.
The resolution also calls for the release of two Reuters reporters, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, who reported on the killing of 10 Rohingya men in Rakhine State in the west of the country, implicating Myanmar’s security forces.
A Myanmar judge found the two reporters guilty of breaching a law on state secrets and jailed them for seven years in September.
“The State Department had access to the exact same data when developing its report, yet we don’t have any policy announcement from Secretary Pompeo on a genocide determination, nor any other public statement on how the administration views the brutality. What is the reason for this silence?” Democratic Senator Ed Markey said in a statement to Reuters.
Republican Senator Marco Rubio last week called for an immediate determination of genocide.
The lawyers’ report, based on the work of 18 investigators from 11 countries, found that Rohingya men, women, and children were the victims of “mass shootings and aerial bombardments, gang rapes and severe beatings, torture and burning, and attacks from flamethrowers and grenade launchers.”
It focused on the build-up to and conduct of “major systematic attacks” in Myanmar’s Rakhine state between Aug. 25 and Sept. 4 of 2017.
Even as the Rohingya fled for Bangladesh they were fired on by military helicopters while the Myanmar Navy sought to sink overcrowded ferries, the report said, adding this showed the campaign went beyond the aim of merely driving the people out.
“The scale and severity of the attacks and abuses … suggest that, in the minds of the perpetrators, the goal was not just to expel, but also to exterminate the Rohingya,” the report said.


Login to post comments


(0)



Nepal, India and China: Fostering ties that bind

Bal Krishna Dahal

Nepal and India, Nepal and China and China and India share unique and historic bilateral relations. Time has now come to foster tripartite ties and enhance cooperation through joint efforts for shared benefits
Nepal has for decades maintained good bilateral relations with her two giant neighbours — India and China. India and China enjoy their own bilateral relations. Leaders of the three countries meet regularly either at bilateral levels or at the regional or international forums. Frequent high-level bilateral exchanges between the countries have always played a crucial role in strengthening the relations.

The longstanding relationship between Nepal and China can be traced back to the seventh century. Around 600-650 BC, Nepali princess Bhrikuti was married to the Tibetan Emperor Songsten Gampo. Princess Bhrikuti took Buddhists relics and Thangkas to Tibet, and established Buddhism in Tibet. Since that time Nepal and China started importing and exporting sculptures and paintings.
The cooperation between China and Nepal was further strengthened by the joint efforts of both sides. The two countries have cooperated constructively in various fields. In recent times, the two sides are in a bid to further strengthen the cooperation through China’s Belt and Road Initiative. The two sides have signed a number of cooperation agreements, including the Economic and Technical Cooperation Agreement.
Since the establishment of diplomatic relationship of Nepal with China in 1960, our bilateral relations are guided by the principles of equality, mutual benefit and mutual respect.
China is Nepal’s important development partner in the areas such as infrastructure, power development, communication, agriculture and technology, education and culture, tourism and aviation, capacity building, health, people’s livelihood, disaster prevention and mitigation, and cultural heritage renovation. With the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation under the Belt and Road Initiative on May 12, 2017 in Kathmandu between Nepal and China, new avenues for bilateral cooperation in mutually agreed areas are expected to open. Nepal expects to upgrade its vital infrastructure, enhance cross-border connectivity with China and enhance people-to-people relations.
India and China are two very populous countries with ancient civilisations and a time honoured history, which dates back 2,000 years, and since the establishment of diplomatic ties between two countries, friendship and cooperation have made significant progress. China is India’s largest trading partner in the world and India is China’s seventh largest export destination. Many Indian projects in China are focused in sectors such as automobiles, energy, computer accessories, machinery, telecommunication and export of steel. Similarly more than 100 Chinese companies operate in India. Many Indian banks and Chinese banks have branches in each other’s countries.
Cultural and economic relations between China and India date back to ancient times. The Silk Road not only served as a major trade route between India and China, but is also credited for facilitating the spread of Buddhism from India to East Asia.
Since the late 1980s, both countries have successfully developed diplomatic and economic ties. In 2008, China became India’s largest trading partner and the two countries have also extended their strategic and military relations. Apart from trade and commerce, there are some other areas of mutual interest on which China and India have been cooperating of late. Currently, the two countries are cooperating on a range of international issues like trade, climate change and reform of the global financial order, among others, to promote common interest.
In June 2012, China stated its position that “Sino-Indian ties” could be the most “important bilateral partnership of the century”. Bilateral trade between China and India touched US$89.6 billion in 2017-18. This figure excludes bilateral trade between India and Hong Kong which stands at another US$34 billion.
India still remains one of the major sources of remittance to Nepal. India is Nepal’s largest trade partner and the largest source of foreign investments, besides providing transit for almost the entire third country trade of Nepal. India accounts for over two-third of Nepal’s merchandise trade, trade in services, foreign direct investments, petroleum supplies, and a significant share of inward remittances on account of pensioners and workers. During the early 1970s, India absorbed almost all of Nepal’s exports and accounted for nearly 90 per cent of Nepal’s imports.
Nepal’s transit trade is routed through 22 designated routes from India-Nepal border to the port of Haldia. In addition, Nepal’s trade with and through Bangladesh also transits through India. Government of India is providing assistance for development of cross-border trade related infrastructure.
The relationship of both China and India with Nepal has become stronger in the last 30 years. For regional peace, prosperity and stability, friendly tripartite relations in the 21st century between India, China and Nepal should be actively harnessed.
For stability, prosperity and inclusive development a CIN (China-India-Nepal) wing should be developed to further the foster inter-state and people-to-people contacts.
Dahal is a Nepali Congress member of 13th National Convention.

Comment

Bal Krishna Dahal

Nepal and India, Nepal and China and China and India share unique and historic bilateral relations. Time has now come to foster tripartite ties and enhance cooperation through joint efforts for shared benefits
Nepal has for decades maintained good bilateral relations with her two giant neighbours — India and China. India and China enjoy their own bilateral relations. Leaders of the three countries meet regularly either at bilateral levels or at the regional or international forums. Frequent high-level bilateral exchanges between the countries have always played a crucial role in strengthening the relations.

The longstanding relationship between Nepal and China can be traced back to the seventh century. Around 600-650 BC, Nepali princess Bhrikuti was married to the Tibetan Emperor Songsten Gampo. Princess Bhrikuti took Buddhists relics and Thangkas to Tibet, and established Buddhism in Tibet. Since that time Nepal and China started importing and exporting sculptures and paintings.
The cooperation between China and Nepal was further strengthened by the joint efforts of both sides. The two countries have cooperated constructively in various fields. In recent times, the two sides are in a bid to further strengthen the cooperation through China’s Belt and Road Initiative. The two sides have signed a number of cooperation agreements, including the Economic and Technical Cooperation Agreement.
Since the establishment of diplomatic relationship of Nepal with China in 1960, our bilateral relations are guided by the principles of equality, mutual benefit and mutual respect.
China is Nepal’s important development partner in the areas such as infrastructure, power development, communication, agriculture and technology, education and culture, tourism and aviation, capacity building, health, people’s livelihood, disaster prevention and mitigation, and cultural heritage renovation. With the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation under the Belt and Road Initiative on May 12, 2017 in Kathmandu between Nepal and China, new avenues for bilateral cooperation in mutually agreed areas are expected to open. Nepal expects to upgrade its vital infrastructure, enhance cross-border connectivity with China and enhance people-to-people relations.
India and China are two very populous countries with ancient civilisations and a time honoured history, which dates back 2,000 years, and since the establishment of diplomatic ties between two countries, friendship and cooperation have made significant progress. China is India’s largest trading partner in the world and India is China’s seventh largest export destination. Many Indian projects in China are focused in sectors such as automobiles, energy, computer accessories, machinery, telecommunication and export of steel. Similarly more than 100 Chinese companies operate in India. Many Indian banks and Chinese banks have branches in each other’s countries.
Cultural and economic relations between China and India date back to ancient times. The Silk Road not only served as a major trade route between India and China, but is also credited for facilitating the spread of Buddhism from India to East Asia.
Since the late 1980s, both countries have successfully developed diplomatic and economic ties. In 2008, China became India’s largest trading partner and the two countries have also extended their strategic and military relations. Apart from trade and commerce, there are some other areas of mutual interest on which China and India have been cooperating of late. Currently, the two countries are cooperating on a range of international issues like trade, climate change and reform of the global financial order, among others, to promote common interest.
In June 2012, China stated its position that “Sino-Indian ties” could be the most “important bilateral partnership of the century”. Bilateral trade between China and India touched US$89.6 billion in 2017-18. This figure excludes bilateral trade between India and Hong Kong which stands at another US$34 billion.
India still remains one of the major sources of remittance to Nepal. India is Nepal’s largest trade partner and the largest source of foreign investments, besides providing transit for almost the entire third country trade of Nepal. India accounts for over two-third of Nepal’s merchandise trade, trade in services, foreign direct investments, petroleum supplies, and a significant share of inward remittances on account of pensioners and workers. During the early 1970s, India absorbed almost all of Nepal’s exports and accounted for nearly 90 per cent of Nepal’s imports.
Nepal’s transit trade is routed through 22 designated routes from India-Nepal border to the port of Haldia. In addition, Nepal’s trade with and through Bangladesh also transits through India. Government of India is providing assistance for development of cross-border trade related infrastructure.
The relationship of both China and India with Nepal has become stronger in the last 30 years. For regional peace, prosperity and stability, friendly tripartite relations in the 21st century between India, China and Nepal should be actively harnessed.
For stability, prosperity and inclusive development a CIN (China-India-Nepal) wing should be developed to further the foster inter-state and people-to-people contacts.
Dahal is a Nepali Congress member of 13th National Convention.


Login to post comments


(0)



FRONT PAGE
EDITORIAL
COMMENTS
INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS
INFOTECH
CULTURE
MISCELLANY
AVIATOUR
FOUNDING EDITOR: ENAYETULLAH KHAN; EDITOR: SAYED KAMALUDDIN
Contents Copyrighted © by Holiday Publication Limited
Mailing address 30, Tejgaon Industrial Area, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh.
Phone 880-2-8170462, 8170463, 8170464 Fax 880-2-9127927 Email weeklyholiday65@gmail.com
Site Managed By: Southtech Group
Southtech Group does not take any responsibility for any news content of this site