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ELECTORAL DEADLOCK PREVAILS
Suspense, rumours, and the Palton flare up make it worse
Shahid Islam
 
If you put a black cat in the darkest corner of a dark room, even a scientist will fail to detect it. A philosopher will spot it anyway; not by the stink that may emit from the cat’s body, or by the radiant eye blur of the cat in the peach dark, but by the inherent hunch of the philosopher who can see things not seen by others. That may be why Plato once said: labours’ sweat, soldiers’ alertness and philosophers’ guidelines keep a nation safe and sustained.
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Shahid Islam
 
If you put a black cat in the darkest corner of a dark room, even a scientist will fail to detect it. A philosopher will spot it anyway; not by the stink that may emit from the cat’s body, or by the radiant eye blur of the cat in the peach dark, but by the inherent hunch of the philosopher who can see things not seen by others. That may be why Plato once said: labours’ sweat, soldiers’ alertness and philosophers’ guidelines keep a nation safe and sustained.
Our national ‘black cat’ is hard to locate in the darkest of the ambiance created by a recurring electoral deadlock that is hard to penetrate. The EC said on Wednesday that it would seriously consider the deferral of the election by three more weeks, following its meeting with Dr. Kamal, et al. of the United National Front (UNF). PM’s adviser H.T Imam implored upon the EC not to change the December 30 date after he met the EC hours later. The penultimate days of the December collide with the Christmas and New Year’s Eve; a time when no western election observers will leave their family to visit Bangladesh, insists the UNF.
 
Suspense lingers
Add to it the absence of the military as the ‘empowered umpire’ during the electioning, something the UNF demanded but the government washed aside.  The Shakespearean suspense so generated about the election—to be or not to be—does not hinge on the uncertainty relating to the date alone. To be candid, neither side—-the regime and the UNF—- is serious about an electoral battle, as we alluded to on this page last week. 
The BNP’s joining of an election under the incumbent set up not only compromises its principled stand of the past, for which it had boycotted the 2014 election and paid a hefty price. Had BNP been in the existing parliament, the convictions rendered by the courts to both of the party’s top leaders—-Mrs. Zia and Tarek Rahman—-would have been different, or a matter peripheral in terms of ramifications.
For the government, writings on the wall are indicative of bad omens. Privately conducted surveys—few of them by national and international intelligence agencies—show the plausibility of the AL-led grand alliance loosing big time in the upcoming election; especially following the surge in the popularity of the UNF, in which many prominent former AL leaders like Dr. Kamal Hossain, Qader Siddiqui, Mahmudur Rahman Manna and Sulton Monsur had butted in to constitute the inner coterie of the UNF. 
The UNF today is a colossus political force to be reckoned and revered. No wonder a leading vernacular daily had scooped lately that over 200 senior AL stalwarts are on the line up to join the UNF if their bid to obtain nomination from the AL fails.
Break up of AL?
Andalib Partho, leader of a faction of the JP, cautioned lately that ‘time has come for the entire AL to get merged with the BNP.’ Overstated? Yes. Devoid of fact? No. Imagine a scenario in which the election gets deferred indefinitely as it did in 2007, and most of the top notches of the AL are found looped in incarceration and litigations stemming from power usurpation to hybrid corruption. The option then for the honest, patriotic AL leaders and workers will be to join the BNP due to one single reason: both the parties now have almost identical ideologies. The AL no more is the whip stick of the socialism of the 60s and the 70s.
There is another potent reason that may rupture the AL’s foundation, of which too this scribe had alluded to in the last issue of The Holiday. The nation now sinks and swims in the midst of a suppressed nationalistic-Islamic fervor; being hemmed in and overwhelmed by economic and political accesses of a powerful neighbor on one hand, and the brutal treatment meted out to the political Islamists by the AL-led regime during a decade of dreadfulness and political degeneration, on the other. 
In the last 10 years or so, no one dared to challenge the ‘truth’ defined by the regime; constitution and law got whisked away to the sidelines; police and RAB behaved like a marauding mafia force; and, even a chief justice got kicked out of the country for rendering a verdict that went beyond the liking of the regime. That’s why the AL can ill afford to quit power, but quit it must—if not in the hasting, through a mass uprising or a revolution that just waits in the corner. This reality too, the money-fat, idiosyncratic, power-blind rulers can’t see; like the scientist who fails to detect the black cat in a dark room.
 
Exit and re-entry
The best bait for the AL, as it is for the BNP, is not to allow the election to get consummated on time; to allow an emergency or neutral regime to smoothen the earth for the next harvest; and to reorganize to re-emerge later to move to the next chapter of the AL politics that time may testify to be the most crucial phase of the party’s existence since 1949.
A delayed election will also render the BNP the time-space it needs to fight out court battles to get its senior leaders cleared of the convictions that are mostly flimsy, untenable, and un-probative; especially after similar allegations against the incumbent PM and other AL leaders having been quashed by the courts in days bygone. 
 
Palton flare up and beyond
What happened on Wednesday before the Palton office of the BNP, where thousands flocked to buy nomination paper, is just the beginning of what may follow in the country in the run up to the election—if there’s one on time. What was so wrong about Mirza Abbas-led procession that the police said went rowdy and made them to lurch into coercive action against the processionals? 
The ensuing skirmishes, and burning of police vehicles, inject murky impressions in peoples’ mind for many reasons; foremost among which is the audacity of the police to park vehicles in the near vicinity of the BNP office where thousands of enraged, depraved, suppressed BNP leaders and workers flocked after years of virtual wilderness. As well, the helmet-wearing hooligans are known poster boys of a ‘fifth column of subversion’ that emerges in every incident to conduct rampage on behalf of power that be, and blame the opposition for the committed crime. Its time this ‘caught up’ game is abandoned to avoid being recorded and evidenced by thousands of cell phone cameras churning around.
 
Tactic & strategy
Incidents like this will keep occurring across the country in coming weeks, and, may culminate into something grand in the end. Yet, holding of timely election being a constitutional compulsion of the incumbent regime, it ought and should occur. The caveat is: the BNP abandoned its eletion-participation-preconditions of the government’s and the parliament’s dissolution, and the demand for military deployment with magistracy power, as a tactic to fulfill its grand strategy. 
The BNP will join the poll game, kick the voting ball, and may withdraw from the contest mid-way on the Election Day due to the certainty of vote rigging by the incumbent regime and its lackeys in the absence of the military on guard, empowered to catch and punish riggers. Take for guaranteed, no one have faith on the honesty and neutrality of the police, RAB or the BGB anymore; after what they have done to the people in the decade passed by. Hence, holding the election on time entails too big a risk for the regime due to the uncertainty it entails in terms of how things may snowball from a ‘rigged’ election to the day after, and beyond.
 
Romours and humours
Amidst such uncertainties, rumours and humours keep swirling. A face book posting implored viewers that—due to the #thankyouPM publicity stunt for the PM at the government’s cost—whatever party wins the next election, Sheikh Hasina should remain as the PM to keep developing the nation. This may sound surreal and hilariously humourous. 
The flip side is: rumours too are spinning like silk fabric in the high wind that the nation is headed toward something very serious and unpredictable; especially Western democracies not being in the mood to digest another faulty election in the midst of the subdued political Islamists’ ‘war preparation’ in the background. Read between my lines, keep fingers crossed, and, stay tuned for an ugly electoral odyssey that had just begun to churn ahead. (face book: Shahid Islam).

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Police must use restraint to protect election environment from chaos

Faruque Ahmed

 
The sudden clash between police and BNP supporters in and around the party central office at Nayapaltan in the city raised the ominous question how the election environment may turn critically violent by visible and invisible forces without visible reasons.
Questions have been raised by many as to who controls police after the election schedules were announced. As per election rules police must work under direct control of the election commission after the election schedules were made public.
Full Story

Faruque Ahmed

 
The sudden clash between police and BNP supporters in and around the party central office at Nayapaltan in the city raised the ominous question how the election environment may turn critically violent by visible and invisible forces without visible reasons.
Questions have been raised by many as to who controls police after the election schedules were announced. As per election rules police must work under direct control of the election commission after the election schedules were made public.
In their views had it been so police could neutrally work and many untoward incidents not good for a fair election could be avoided.  
The chaos is on the rise at a time when the Oikyafront leaders have demanded delay of election date by three weeks from December 3o. A delegation led by Dr Kamal Hussain made the request to the EC but another Awami League delegation on the day demanded that the date can’t be shifted anymore. 
Front spokesman Mirza Faakhrul Islam Alamgir said whether or not the OIkyafront will take part in the election will depend on the action of the EC and the government over the next few days. The question of level plain field has also astutely captured the opposition mind  fresh in the backdrop of police action on party supporters in front of its Nayapaltan office.     
It is natural police should keep reasonable distance from programme of opposition political parties in the streets and they should not go for controversial arrests other than playing the role of maintaining law and orders.  A situation like ploughing a vehicle into party activists crowds would not have arisen had there been different instructions.  
Election Commissioner (EC) Mahbub Talukder has rightly said at a commission meeting that police must work under full control of the EC; its control must be effective for them to ensure a neutral role to hold the election free and fair and acceptable to all. 
It is clear the present government is an election time government under the incumbent Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina and police are similarly operating under the control of the Home Minister. In such situation many believe expecting neutrality from police is nightmarish, particularly after a long period of their politicization by the government.  
So any meaningful application of election code of conduct at field level may remain a far cry when it comes about giving equal space to opposition candidates.  A minister in his constituency will get police protection, if not protocols’ as EC says; MPs may also enjoy similar police protection in clear discrimination to opposition candidates, many of them may be on run.  
It appears the EC has issued long instruction to the Returning Officers and other field level officers for holding a free and fair election but who controls police remains unanswered in the meeting. Continuation of police control in the hands of the government has apparently left the election mechanism open to manipulation. 
Many however believe when the EC is not strong enough to use its powers to hold a free and fair election, who controls police does not make much the difference.              
Police role is already under scrutiny in election duty.  At the beginning of last week Awami League aspirants for the upcoming parliamentary election collected nomination papers in jubilant celebration of the event. Candidates staged bizarre show down of their strength gathering supporters in front of the Dhanmondi party office and around it. 
The massive gatherings had blocked several city roads in the area for over three days left traffic movement in jeopardy and easy movement of local residents difficult. But when it comes about gathering of BNP candidates and their supporters at their place; why police moved into action to break their festive  event has raised many questions. Many believe their impressive presence at party office didn’t auger well to many watching the return of BNP to election politics.     
The Election Commission (EC) had earlier justified festive celebration in front of Awami League office during nomination collection as not a violation of election code and police protected it. This difference in police action at BNP office is difficult to many to understand. 
The EC secretary agreed in talks with journalists that BNP candidates show down at party office at  Nayapaltan is not also a violation of election code. Such show down during submission of nomination papers to returning officers is however a breach of the election cod. So questions have been raised why police acted on the BNP’s show down which was not a violation of code of conduct.   
They intruded into the show down of BNP leader Mirza Abbas when he led a group of several hundred supporters to the party’s Nayapaltan office on Wednesday to collect nomination papers.  Law enforcers at this stage asked BNP activists to clear half of the traffic lane they were occupying. Party workers ignored the order that led police to plough a vehicle into the crowd, injuring many at the spot.  
Law enforcers then charged baton on some of them, triggering a chase and counter chase. Police also fired rubber bullets and tear gas shells while BNP activists hurled brickbats creating panic among locals in the entire area. At one stage, two police vehicles were vandalized and torched.
A young man wearing a helmet was seen hitting the windshield of one of the police cars with a chair while another man torched the car. BNP blamed police for triggering the unnecessary violence and use of plain clothe agents for destroying vehicles. Police blamed unruly BNP men for the chaos. 
Meanwhile, Awami League general secretary Obidul Qader has openly blamed Mirza Abbas for violence to destabilize election environment. BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir on the other hand blamed Chatra League cadres for destroying the vehicles under police cover. 
Awami League leaders said the torching of vehicles is part of BNP’s destructive politics of arson and killing that it used before and after 2014 election. BNP leaders said Awami League is masters of all such violent activities and the torching of police vehicles once again showed the party is planning to snatch the election using chaos and police as elections is coming closer.  
Such blame and counter blame is nothing new but many fear the renewal of the practice has come as a renewed threat to peace and public safety.

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Comments: The columnist through his skilful analysis presented the facts in a glaring manner. Its a clear indication that BAL Govt lead by sk hasina who is used to all sorts of lies, false promises and dirty tricks will not allow free and fair election under any circumstances. She has arranged for an election according to her sweet will and set up a strange mechanism what the democratic world never witnessed nor heard of to ensure her indefinite continuity in power. Here it is crystal clear from the write up that all three organs, Govt,CEC and police are all hands in gloves.So what hope is left for the opposition contestants for a fair election. This is just starting further surprises by her are yet to expose before the nation.Here police initiated the action of provocation and all happened as per the blue print. All attempts will be to force the UNF to withdraw from the election. CEC has proved to be a BAL die hard supporter . Only a third force in national interest should come forward and save the nation from rolling into dark hole forever. only they can stage a neutral election. But where are they? Sk hasina ruling this nation for further 5 years means the death of democracy forever for this country and rule of BAKSAL for indefinite time. Respectable Professor A. SAyeed openly said this constitution is faulty . There is no check and balance at all.Political Party interest is above all. In the context of our country and the mindset of the politicians even if at least the President of the country was a non political with a towering personality from the civic society would have been a deterrent for the all all powerful P.M.We have many gems both from military and civil bodies. But surprisingly no one talks of reforms. Sk hasina after coming to power through CTG has conveniently scrapped it and amended the constitution to her sweet will that nothing is left for the democracy and people's rule. THis is the last and only chance for democracy to survive . This is do or die situation . May ALLAH bestow HIS RAHMAT on all of us. Sk hasina lies at every step .How can you rely on her sweet talks and promises? Let the countyry belong to people.
Commented by : Bashar, Surrey U.K.



HRW asks BD to halt Rohingya repatriation plan

Special Correspondent
 
The Bangladesh government should follow the recommendations of senior United Nations refugee and human rights officials and immediately halt the proposed repatriation of Rohingya refugees to Myanmar, Human Rights Watch.
The authorities have deployed the army in refugee camps ahead of carrying out a plan to repatriate a first group of 2,200 Rohingya refugees, according to a report of the New York-based rights organisation published, said the US-based rights group on Thursday.
Full Story
Special Correspondent
 
The Bangladesh government should follow the recommendations of senior United Nations refugee and human rights officials and immediately halt the proposed repatriation of Rohingya refugees to Myanmar, Human Rights Watch.
The authorities have deployed the army in refugee camps ahead of carrying out a plan to repatriate a first group of 2,200 Rohingya refugees, according to a report of the New York-based rights organisation published, said the US-based rights group on Thursday.
The first batch of 150 people from 30 families were taken to a transit camp in preparation for their return. Bangladesh’s refugee relief and repatriation commissioner, Mohammad Abul Kalam, told journalists the families would be repatriated through the Ghundhum point of Bandarban district on November 15.
“They are fully prepared,” he said. “We have made all arrangements.” Subsequent reports, however, indicated possible delays in the starting date.
“The Bangladesh government will be stunned to see how quickly international opinion turns against it if it starts sending unwilling Rohingya refugees back into harm’s way in Myanmar,” said Bill Frelick, refugee rights director.
“That Dhaka deployed its army into the camps is a red flag that this terrified community is not willing to return.”
Under pressure from China, Bangladesh and Myanmar officials met in Dhaka on October 30 and 31, the third meeting of a joint working group to carry out a bilateral repatriation agreement signed in November 2017. Following the meeting, representatives announced that they had a “very concrete plan” to begin repatriations in mid-November, with the first round to include 2,260 Rohingya from 485 families. According to Myanmar officials, the plan calls for 150 refugees to be received each week, starting on November 15, at the Nga Khu Ya reception center before being transferred to the Hla Poe Kaung transit camp.
Although Bangladesh authorities have said all repatriations would be voluntary, they have also been strongly encouraging the Rohingya to return. The authorities have built two repatriation centers where the refugees will remain until their return to Myanmar, the release added.
The imminent return has caused panic in the refugee camp. “This is forced. This is involuntary. Not one person in the camp wants to go back,” a Rohingya refugee told Human Rights Watch. “They will kill us if we go back.”
“Camp situation very bad now,” another refugee wrote on WhatsApp, saying that some families were being forced to go to transit centers.
“Authorities are surrounding [the] camp, Rohingya people will not go back to Myanmar without justice and security of the UN.”
More than 730,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh over the past year to escape the Myanmar military’s campaign of ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. They joined about 200,000 refugees who had fled previous waves of violence and persecution. A UN fact-finding mission found “sufficient information to warrant the investigation and prosecution of senior officials in the Tatmadaw [armed forces] on charges of genocide.”
The Myanmar government has rejected these allegations. It has said that it is ready to accept repatriated refugees and has accused Bangladesh of delaying the process. However, the Myanmar authorities have done nothing to create conditions for safe and dignified returns or to address the root causes of the crisis, including systematic persecution and violence, statelessness, and impunity for grave violations by the military. Myanmar has refused to acknowledge the Rohingya ethnicity of the refugees or to recognize them as its citizens.
The Rohingya fear that upon return, they will be in placed in detention camps. They point out that more than 124,000 Rohingya have been similarly confined for six years, since being displaced by violence in 2012.
The “reception centers” and “transit camp” Myanmar built this year to process and house returnees from Bangladesh are surrounded by barbed-wire perimeter fences and security outposts, similar to the physical confinement structures in the central Rakhine internally displaced persons camps. The Hla Poe Kaung reception center was built on land where Rohingya had been living before security forces burned and the government bulldozed the area.
“Nothing the Myanmar government has said or done suggests that the Rohingya will be safe upon return,” Frelick said. “Bangladesh needs to uphold its international obligations - and maintain its well-earned international reputation for providing refuge to the Rohingya - and not grab at quick and illusory solutions that will once again put desperate people at risk.”

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BORDER HAAT DISTRURBED
Patriotic forum urges Modi to defuse tension in Assam
Nava Thakuria in Guwahati
 
Expressing serious concern over mounting tensions between two valleys of Assam in the recent past, a forum of patriotic peoples in northeast India urged Prime Minister Narendra Modi to take personal initiative in defusing relentless worries among the residents.  
The nationalist citizens asserted that few anti-national elements were working against the social harmony where the State government in Dispur surprisingly remained silent.
Full Story
Nava Thakuria in Guwahati
 
Expressing serious concern over mounting tensions between two valleys of Assam in the recent past, a forum of patriotic peoples in northeast India urged Prime Minister Narendra Modi to take personal initiative in defusing relentless worries among the residents.  
The nationalist citizens asserted that few anti-national elements were working against the social harmony where the State government in Dispur surprisingly remained silent.
Patriotic People’s Front Assam (PPFA) recently noted that on the backdrop of New Delhi’s citizenship amendment initiative in favour of religious minorities from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan, the State witnessed an uproarious situation, where most of the Assamese speaking residents in Brahmaputra valley opposed it and those of Barak valley supported the move.  
Lately a section of authors, editor-journalists, former militants and social activists have explained the Citizenship Amendment Bill 2016 in a biased manner for repeated times that the bill would be applicable for Assam only and once it is passed in the Parliament millions of Hindu Bangladeshi families would arrive in the State demanding Indian citizenship and the process would continue until India is made a land of Hindus.  “A protester has the right to own point of view according to put his/her game plan and that also may be published in newspapers or telecast through news  channels. But the authority should promptly respond to any biased views and clarify the government position.  Otherwise, the common people would be misinformed and they might get confused,” said the forum.
It expresses unhappiness that the State government was yet to make effective arrangements to enlighten the locals about the citizenship bill. The debates around the bill continue revolving with half truths and motivated facts, which had only increased the anxiety of Assamese people in the last few months, claimed the statement.  “We donot know what has prevented the State government (read Assam chief minister Sarbananda Sonowal) from clarifying to the people that most of the agitators in Brahmaputra valley were debating with illusionary facts. Sonowal, also in charge of State home and IPR, should have taken some initiatives to counter the campaign with disinformation and finally educate the people about actual contents of the bill,” added PPFA.
Need not to mention that taking advantage of the chief minister’s silence over the citizenship bill, many started raising voices in full public view that  Sonowal must clarify his stand (whether he is with the locals or Bangladeshi migrants). Even the separatist elements like  United Liberation Front of Assam (Independent) reportedly stepped into the trouble water to get advantage, where the rift between the Assamese and Bengali communities turn more visible.
The banned militant outfit may even try to mislead the Assamese community in Brahmaputra valley with the argument that the said bill is an imposition of New Delhi over Assam following the diktat of Bengali elements, cautioned the forum.
So it appealed to Prime Minister to clarify that the concerned bill is not at all Assam centric and there is no provision for inviting more Bangladeshi citizens after 31 December 2014. Public meetings, media advertisements and putting hoardings in responsive localities may be some affective ways for disseminating the information, stated the forum adding that PM Modi should urgently address growing anxieties of the Assamese community.
“We prefer a healthy debate over the Citizenship Amendment Bill 2016 across the country. As Assam is boiling over the issue, the people here should get enlightened first about the bill so that they can participate in the debate with facts avoiding unnecessary emotions,” stated the forum adding that otherwise the discourses would affect the existing communal harmony among various linguistic, religious and ethnic groups, for which Assam is known for since time immemorial.
According to latest  report,the Autonomous State Demand Committee (ASDC), Karbi Student Association (KSA) and Karbi Nimso Chingthur Asong (KNCA) staged a demonstration against the Union government’s move to grant ST(H) status to the Bodos living in Karbi Anglong and Dima Hasao.
More than 10,000 people took out a protest rally from the Ru-Semsonsing Ingti Memorial Park to Rongpharpi Rongbe Statue on Monday.
A memorandum was submitted to Union Tribal Affairs Minister Jual Oram through the Deputy Commissioner of Karbi Anglong district, demanding revocation of the Union Cabinet decision to grant Scheduled Tribe (Hills) status to Bodo Kacharis living in the hill district of Karbi Anglong and Dima Hasao and West Karbi Anglong.
Border Haat disturbed
Meanwhile,  another  report  adds:  Miscreants on Tuesday allegedly disrupted trading at the India-Bangladesh “Border Haat” in Tripura. Later authorities asked the police to take action against those who were preventing vendors from entering the border market.
Talking about the incident, Additional District Magistrate (ADM) of Sepahijala District Suresh Chandra Das said, “Some people are reportedly preventing. license holder vendors to enter the Kamlasagar ‘Border Haat’. I have personally visited the Kamlasagar border market and asked the police to take action against those who are creating trouble.”
Das, who is the Co-Chairman of the Kamlasagar “Border Haat” management committee, said that out of the 25 vendors from the Indian side, only two sellers had opened their shops on Sunday.
Talking to the media about the incident, the existing vendors said that some people, backed by the ruling parties, were preventing license holder vendors, selected for three years during the previous Left Front government, from carrying out their business since October 28.
Shyamal Kar, an Indian vendor  said, “As the Indian vendors were not allowed to open their shops, Bangladeshi vendors and buyers were not interested to come to the market.”
India and Bangladesh have so far set up four “Border Haats” (markets) in Tripura and Meghalaya. The ‘Border Haat’ is not only a marketplace but also a meeting ground for friends and relatives from both sides of the border. In the “Border Haat”, 25 vendors each from India and Bangladesh are allowed to sell their local produce without any duty or tax.
The trade at border haats is permitted to be carried out in Indian Rupees/Bangladesh Taka and on a barter basis, and data of such trade is maintained by the Haat Management Committee of the respective border haat.
The border haats aim at promoting the wellbeing of the people dwelling in remote areas across the borders of two countries by establishing a traditional system of marketing the local produce through local markets.
Officials of the two countries recently held meetings here to set up six more “Border Haats” along the frontiers with the northeastern states.
The states of Tripura, Meghalaya, Mizoram, and Assam share a 1,880 km border with Bangladesh.
The government of India has also executed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the government of the Republic of Union of Myanmar on the establishment of border haats along their border.

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KASHMIR WEEK

Authorities impose curfew like restrictions at Jamia on Friday to foil any attempts of protest. — KT Photo/Qazi Irshad
Online agencies
 
The troops of India and Pakistan exchanged gunfire along the line of control (LoC) in Tangdhar area of Kashmir’s Kupwara district last week (Nov 09). 
However, there was no report of any casualties on either side in the exchange of fire.
Menwhile, Two Hizb ul Mujahideen militants were killed in a gunfight with Idian  forces in Tikken area of south Kashmir’s Pulwama district on Saturday.

 

Full Story
Authorities impose curfew like restrictions at Jamia on Friday to foil any attempts of protest. — KT Photo/Qazi Irshad
Online agencies
 
The troops of India and Pakistan exchanged gunfire along the line of control (LoC) in Tangdhar area of Kashmir’s Kupwara district last week (Nov 09). 
However, there was no report of any casualties on either side in the exchange of fire.
Menwhile, Two Hizb ul Mujahideen militants were killed in a gunfight with Idian  forces in Tikken area of south Kashmir’s Pulwama district on Saturday.

 

A spokesman said that the state police and the forces lanched a cordon and search operation (CASO) in Tikken area based on “credible” inputs about the presence of militants in the area when  the militants from  hiding fired on the search party. “The fire was retaliated, leading to an encounter,” he said.
In the ensuing gunfight, two militants were killed whose bodies were retrieved from the site of the gunfight, police said.
The slain were identified as Liyaqat Wani of Below and Wajid ul Islam of Babhara village of Pulwama “Incriminating materials including arms and ammunition were recovered from the site of encounter. Police has registered a case and initiated investigation in the instant matter,” said the spokesman.
The authorizes  also  suspended Internet services in Pulwama district following  the  encounter. 
Meanwhile, former Pakistan cricketer Shahid Khan Afridi has asked India and Pakistan to leave Kashmir “for the sake of humanity” and let Kashmiris decide their own future.
“Don’t give Kashmir to Pakistan or India either. Let them be independent. Humanity is big thing. Human are being killed there (Kashmir). It hurts to see humans are being killed whatever religion they may belong,” Afridi said while addressing the students at British Parliament.
The flamboyant cricketer further said Pakistan is already struggling to manage its four provinces.  “It hurts to see the sufferings of Kashmiris, For the sake of #Humanity #India and #Pakistan should leave #Kashmir and let the Kashmiris decide their future, we are already struggling to manage four provinces” says @SAfridiOfficial speaking to the students at British Parliament.

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Northeast India oppose neighouring nationals: (NESO)

Online agencies
 
The Indian NESO (North East Students’ Organization) has waged a war against the Citizenship Amendment Bill, 2016; Foreigners (Amendment) Order, 2015; Passport (Entry into India) Notification, 2015 and the move for long-term visas to citizens from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan.
Full Story
Online agencies
 
The Indian NESO (North East Students’ Organization) has waged a war against the Citizenship Amendment Bill, 2016; Foreigners (Amendment) Order, 2015; Passport (Entry into India) Notification, 2015 and the move for long-term visas to citizens from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan.
Representing a united Northeast, NESO chairman Samuel Jyrwa briefed the media in Guwahati on Wednesday. He said: “The Bill, if passed by the Parliament, will have long-term ramifications in the Northeast. It will push the ethnic groups of the region towards an uncertain future. We’re worried over the illegal immigration into the region. It continues to create social tension and anxieties. Tripura has already lost its tribal identity. The illegal immigrants from Bangladesh are on the verge of outnumbering the indigenous population of Assam in near future.”
Jyrwa said: “We declare our agitation programme to push forward our demands – withdrawal of the controversial Bill, the Order, the Rule and the provision for long-term visas. On November 20 we’re going to stage protest in Guwahati, protest in all the seven State capitals in the region on November 30, a protest rally in New Delhi when the next Parliament session starts, meeting all MLAs, MPs and ministers of the seven states in the region with the demand for opposing the Bill.”
NESO adviser Samujjal Bhattacharjya said: “None of the States in the region is alone. We’ve made it a point to side with each other as and when any of the seven States in the region is in troubles. We’re a united lot. We’re putting a united fight against all problems afflicting us. I want to ask the Centre as to why it is going to impose the controversial Bill on us. I warn the Centre that the Northeast is not a garbage bin for dumping illegal Bangladeshis. It’s nothing but a dangerous design for vote bank. When the NESO is demanding NRCs in each and every state in the region, the government is out to derail the ongoing NRC update exercise in Assam. Toeing the line of Meghalaya and Mizoram all other governments in the region should also reject the Bill outright. We appeal to all political parties based in the region and national parties to stand against the Bill.”

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